Events & Exhibitions » Past Exhibitions

Past Exhibitions

Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time

October 25, 2015 through May 7, 2017

Santa Fe
While still not large, Santa Fe has grown remarkably since 1929. Houses cover the areas that were once farmed, and flat roofs around the Plaza dominate the scene. The Palace of the Governors (now backed by the New Mexico History Museum), the New Mexico Museum of Art, the cathedral, and other beloved buildings are still in use. The Roundhouse has replaced the old capitol building, which was remodeled and converted to administrative use. The river still flows through Santa Fe, at least seasonally, but it is less visible among the sea of buildings that engulf it. A few solar panels show environmental investment by individuals. Photograph by Adriel Heisey, 2015.

Galisteo
Galisteo is now considered statistically part of the Santa Fe metropolitan area, although it is still remote and has a population of less than three hundred people. It is home to a number of well-known artists and scholars, as well as families traditionally linked to the area, none of whom farm on the scale of the past. Galisteo Creek no longer washes away vegetation in the streambed, which now appears to be a lush forested strip. The church and cemeteries remain, as does the layout of the colonial village. Traces of the old narrow fields can still be seen. Photograph by Adriel Heisey, 2015.

For the first time in Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time, large prints of Heisey’s stunning images will be paired directly with the Lindberghs’. The exhibition opens October 25, 2015 and runs through May 7, 2017 at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

During 2007 and 2008, flying at alarmingly low altitudes and slow speeds, Adriel Heisey leaned out the door of his light plane, and holding his camera with both hands, re-photographed some of the Southwest’s most significant archaeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his new bride Anne photographed in 1929.



Pueblo del Arroyo
In the years since the Lindberghs took their photograph of Pueblo del Arroyo, Chaco Wash has been channelized and the arroyo banks have been rebuilt around the tri-walled structure. Most but not all of the pueblo rooms excavated by Judd are still open; some have been backfilled to add stability to the structure. Most of the historic features visible in the Lindbergh photograph have been removed by the National Park Service, although Chaco Canyon Cemetery, burial place of Richard and Marietta Wetherill and present but largely invisible in 1929, can easily be seen against the canyon wall. The park service has added a paved road, a parking lot, and trails for visitors touring the site. Controlling the wash and the removal of grazing stock animals have allowed the vegetation in the canyon to recover. Photograph by Adriel Heisey, 2008.