Events & Exhibitions » Current Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions

Courage and Compassion: Native Women Sculpting Women

 

November 2, 2014 through October 19, 2015
First exhibit of its kind featuring leading American Indian Women sculptors of 20th and 21st centuries   Courage and Compassion: Native Women Sculpting Women opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture Nov. 2, 2014 and runs through Oct. 19, 2015. The exhibition features figures of women sculpted by seven American Indian women artists.  Most of the ten works on view will be in the museum’s outdoor Roland Sculpture Garden. There is a long history of sculpting among the indigenous peoples of the Americas. The artists in Courage and Compassion, while contemporary in their approach are steeped in tradition. Using the same materials as their ancestors did thousands of years ago, the works presented draw on cultural influences of those who have gone before

Footprints: The Inspiration and Influence of Allan Houser

 

August 3, 2014 through June 1, 2015
The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture is proud to honor the hundreth birth year of Allan Houser with this exhibition of his sculptures and those of thirteen Native American artists whose lives he changed forever. Larry Ahvakana, Don Chunestudey, Cliff Fragua, Craig Dan Goseyun, Rollie Grandbois, Bob Haozous, Phillip Mangas Haozous, Doug Hyde, Oreland Joe, Tony Lee, Estella Loretto, Bill Prokopiof and Robert Shorty

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning

 

April 13, 2014 through May 2, 2016
Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning highlights the Museum’s extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and presents all aspects of the stone, from geology, mining and history, to questions of authenticity and value. Hundreds of necklaces, bracelets, belts, rings, earrings, silver boxes and other objects illustrate the stone’s use and its deep significance to the people of the region.  

Native American Portraits: Points of Inquiry

 

February 16, 2014 through January 5, 2015
More than 50 images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives  - along with contemporary images by Native photographers - document the changing perceptions of Native peoples over a span of almost 100 years.

Heartbeat: Music of the Native Southwest

 

September 29, 2013 through September 8, 2015
A celebration of sight, sound, and activity for visitors of all ages, Heartbeat: Music of the Native Southwest, opens Sunday, September 29, 2013 at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Over 100 objects relating to Southwestern Native dance and music will be featured, including a flute made by Grammy award-winning artist Robert Mirabal of Taos Pueblo. Collectively used for indigenous ritual performance, the drums, flutes, rasps, rattles, and clothing featured in the exhibition convey a richly layered message. Music, too, is integral to the ceremony—it is more than accompaniment for the dancers; each song is a prayer providing a pathway to the here and now and to the worlds beyond. The opening on Sunday, September 29, 2013 from 1 to 4 p.m. will feature performances, demonstrations, hands-on activities for the entire family, and refreshments provided by the Women’s Board of the Museum of New Mexico.

The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery

 

on long-term display
The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.

Here, Now and Always

 

on long-term display
Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest's indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum's collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.